20 min looped three-screen installation / 2016

Webb-Ellis, Parlor Walls, 2016. Video still

Webb-Ellis, Parlor Walls, 2016. Video still

Parlor-Walls-video-still best_web

Webb-Ellis, Parlor Walls, 2016. Video still

Parlor Walls takes Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451 as a starting point to explore alienation in the digital age, and the strangeness of contemporary human experience.

Made up of documentary, performance and online videos gleaned over two years, Parlor Walls oscillates between the mythological and the everyday. White clowns, YouTube pseudo intimacy, metal detecting and the atavistic journey of the eel combine in an experimental inquiry into the real, loneliness, desire, memory and touch.

Whilst Fahrenheit 451 presents a distinctly dystopian vision, Parlor Walls harbours a quiet optimism, calling in the oldest of stories to propose new ways of understanding our place within an interconnected world.

Music by Paul Michael Henry with ecologist and writer Alastair McIntosh.

Kindly supported by Whitstable Biennale, Crescent Arts, University for the Creative Arts, Yorkshire Coast CollegeStephen Joseph Theatre and YVAN.

With special thanks to Stuart Cameron, Daniel Cutmore, Matthew De Pulford, Christopher Ellis, Gareth Evans, Lara Goodband, Sue Jones, Daren Kearl and Geraldine Malone.

Webb-Ellis’ studio at Crescent Arts is subsidised by Arts Council England.

Parlor Walls premiered at Whitstable Biennale 2016.

“the overall effect, hypnotically compelling, delivers the message: you are here, you are not alone.” – Fi Churchman, ArtReview

“Parlor Walls retains a quiet optimism, and provides a detailed and experimental inquiry into the real, desire, memory and touch. Definitely worth a look.” – Jacob Brookman, British Journal of Photography

“The artists cite Ray Bradbury’s novel Farenheit 451 as an influence, but the themes of frustrated communication between people and the natural environment extend bewitchingly beyond the original inspiration.” – Matthew Wilson, Aesthetica Magazine

“The solitude of contemporary digital culture is juxtaposed with mythical narratives of migration in this powerful allegory of our time.” – Sophia Phoca, Art Monthly

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Full Reviews

ArtReview By Fi Churchman
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British Journal of Photography By Jacob Brookman
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Aesthetica Magazine By Matthew Wilson
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Art Monthly By Sophia Phoca
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WOW Kent By Tracy Affleck
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this is tomorrow By Betsy Porritt
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The Arts Desk By Mark Sheerin
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